More Than Washing Hands

Humans, by nature, value human life. Since the beginning of recorded history natural disasters have been a fact of human life and often centered on the number of lives lost. The Minoan civilization around 1500 B.C. appears to have been completely obliterated by a volcanic eruption with the assumption of all lives being lost to history. More civilizations have been lost to earthquakes and floods. If Noah’s Ark is in fact historical, we can assume the loss of life was astronomical. 

In our lifetime, the Haitian earthquake in 2010 is estimated to have taken between 85,000 to  230,000 human lives, depending on what government recorded the death toll, but its devastation should not be forgotten in the saga of history. Six years earlier, the tsunami in the Indian Ocean swallowed over 200,000 unfortunate souls.

Why are these events significant in light of the current calamity of Coronavirus? Natural disasters bring out the best in human beings. By reflecting on what has happened in the past, we may more easily process how we feel today and put things in perspective. 

Washing hands: Prevention #1

Disaster helps us to understand that while nature can be destructive, life lessons of strength and resiliency can make us all better human beings. In times of crisis, we become more unified, more empathetic, and we work harder for the common good. We develop a deeper sense of spirituality and oneness in our Creator. Those who don’t believe in a God still become more generous, more forgiving, more able to overcome adversity. 

As we stay at home following the rules for “quarantine cooking” we are staying more in touch on social media. Separated families are calling one another more often to check in and express concern and affection for one another. People are donating to charities who feed children unable to go to school. The virus is making a few of us sick, but making far more of us kinder, more generous human beings. It seems as though looking out for one another is our true human nature. We are doing more than washing our hands.

Learn what our local Freestore Foodbank has to say about COVID-19.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Cincinnati

St. Patrick’s Day in America is for some a remembrance of Ireland’s most famous legend who died on March 17 (sometime close to the year 492) known for his influence on Christianity in Ireland, and for others it’s a celebration of the Irish-American culture in the United States. Americans love to wear the green, quaff green beer, generally make merry, and revel in all things Irish. 

Celebrating St. Patrick and all things Irish

What you may not know is that all this Irish merry-making started in Boston, Massachusetts and repeats itself largely in the United States, Canada, the UK and a few other countries around the world that benefitted from the Irish diaspora. In Ireland, aside from the pubs benefitting from the boost in tourism on this day, it’s a traditional day of solemnity with Catholics attending church in the morning and gathering for modest feasts in the afternoon. No parades, no green-tinted foods, and no “wearing of the green.” In Ireland, blue is the traditional color associated with Ireland’s patron saint.

Parades, concerts, and events that likely have ole St. Patrick rolling in his grave keep his memory alive in Cincinnati too!

Lastly, for all of us who are, or pretending to be, Irish this month:

Where to Celebrate

Daily Money Manager Benefits CPA

Eighty year-old widow Maddy still lives in the Ohio home she shared with her husband Phil for 60 years. Her children live far away—one on the east coast, the other on the west coast. Maddy has mild memory loss, an aging issue that to her seems more annoying that anything else. For Maddy today, money is not the problem—being far from family is.

Before Phil’s death, Maddy had thrived as a typical stay-at-home mom devoted to the raising, education and personal development of her children. Phil, a successful business owner, employed a CPA to handle both their business and household finances. The CPA handled the sale of the business after Phil’s death and continued to handle Maddy’s household finances during monthly visits to her home.

A common filing system

While Phil had kept an impeccable filing system, Maddy was quite the opposite. She habitually used unopened bills as bookmarks. The CPA spent hours rummaging through desk drawers, piles of mail, and old magazines to collect all mail related to her financial affairs.

When the CPA took to the Internet to find a “Maddy” solution, he came across an article about Daily Money Managers. He discovered that these professionals pay bills, balance checkbooks, go through mail, review investment and insurance papers, keep track of assets, and organize financial records needed for the IRS. He calculated that hiring a DMM for Maddy would save both him and Maddy time and money.

Today, Maddy happily continues to use unopened bills as bookmarks, but her DMM knows just where to look. She handles Maddy’s personal finances for a fee much lower than the CPA firm, and the CPA now has more time to manage his other high-net-worth clients.

Some CPA firms who also handle investment management for clients can subject the firm to heavier SEC scrutiny or audits, but adding daily money management services through a partnership with a firm like DLMoneyMatters can solve that problem.

Call us today and let us show you how we can help address these types of challenges for you or your clients.