Daily Money Manager Benefits CPA

Eighty year-old widow Maddy still lives in the Ohio home she shared with her husband Phil for 60 years. Her children live far away—one on the east coast, the other on the west coast. Maddy has mild memory loss, an aging issue that to her seems more annoying that anything else. For Maddy today, money is not the problem—being far from family is.

Before Phil’s death, Maddy had thrived as a typical stay-at-home mom devoted to the raising, education and personal development of her children. Phil, a successful business owner, employed a CPA to handle both their business and household finances. The CPA handled the sale of the business after Phil’s death and continued to handle Maddy’s household finances during monthly visits to her home.

A common filing system

While Phil had kept an impeccable filing system, Maddy was quite the opposite. She habitually used unopened bills as bookmarks. The CPA spent hours rummaging through desk drawers, piles of mail, and old magazines to collect all mail related to her financial affairs.

When the CPA took to the Internet to find a “Maddy” solution, he came across an article about Daily Money Managers. He discovered that these professionals pay bills, balance checkbooks, go through mail, review investment and insurance papers, keep track of assets, and organize financial records needed for the IRS. He calculated that hiring a DMM for Maddy would save both him and Maddy time and money.

Today, Maddy happily continues to use unopened bills as bookmarks, but her DMM knows just where to look. She handles Maddy’s personal finances for a fee much lower than the CPA firm, and the CPA now has more time to manage his other high-net-worth clients.

Some CPA firms who also handle investment management for clients can subject the firm to heavier SEC scrutiny or audits, but adding daily money management services through a partnership with a firm like DLMoneyMatters can solve that problem.

Call us today and let us show you how we can help address these types of challenges for you or your clients.

Discipline Matters With Money

The financial status for most working Americans in 2020 can be summed up with one word, “confidence.” But whoa Nelly, not so fast. Yes, employment is at an all time high and earnings are up. However, a study by Northwestern Mutual found that nearly a third of Americans over 18 are within three paychecks of needing to either borrow money or skip paying a few bills.

The study also reports that 22% of us have less than $5,000 saved for retirement and will need to work past retirement age in order to maintain their lifestyle. So are Americans financially overconfident? It would appear so.

So how can we buckle down and build a healthy emergency fund and save for retirement?

  1. Create a budget. I know, it sounds dreary and boring, but reportedly we spend 100x more time watching TV or scrolling our mobile devices than we do working on personal finances. Consider using that device to effortlessly manage your finances with a free app like Mint to see all your bills and bank accounts at a glance, create a budget, and even have access to your credit score.
  2. Pay yourself before you pay your creditors. Set up automatic deposits that move money into savings each month. These deposits will help you avoid spending money frivolously and quickly build your savings and emergency fund.

The size of your emergency fund and retirement savings depends on your lifestyle, monthly costs, income, and dependents. The rule of thumb is to put away from 3 to 6 months’ worth of expenses for emergencies like car repairs, medical bills, job loss, or temporary disability.

Retirement funds vary by age, but having 2x your annual salary by age 40, 4x by age 50, and 6x by age 60 is recommended for your 401(k). If you retire at 67, it recommended to have at least $600,000 saved. 

Many people simply plan to continue working after retirement age and to bank on being in good health and not suffering any layoffs or business failures. The better alternative is to start or increase savings as early as possible. If you never see the money in your wallet or checking account, you won’t miss it.

DL MoneyMatters provides accounting and daily money management services and does not  give investment advice. If you need a trusted financial or investment advisor, we may be able to provide a reference.

Alzheimer’s & Power of Attorney

The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise. According to the Alzheimer’s Association report for 2019, an estimated 5.8 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s and are being cared for by more than 16 million family members. Maybe one of those family members is you!

They project that in thirty years, the number of Alzheimer’s sufferers will reach nearly 14 million.

Children of aging parents who suspect a parent is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, or have  a parent already diagnosed with the disease, should consider a Power of Attorney (POA).

A POA gives a family member the legal right to step in and make decisions that a parent with an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is unable to make themselves, or doesn’t want to. 

There are various, even urgent, situations when having a POA is extremely important. For instance, you may need to:

  • Find a trusted money manager to handle day-to-day bill paying and the daily money management of bills, medical and insurance statements, tax preparation, and other personal financial tasks.
  • Act as family spokesperson regarding medical appointments, surgery, and doctor appointments.
  • Take care of things at home if your parents or loved one is still healthy enough to travel in retirement, or at any time they are away from their home.

We hope you will consider us if Daily Money Management is a concern. We are experienced, trusted, and a member of AADMM, the American Association of Daily Money Managers.