Alzheimer’s & Power of Attorney

The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise. According to the Alzheimer’s Association report for 2019, an estimated 5.8 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s and are being cared for by more than 16 million family members. Maybe one of those family members is you!

They project that in thirty years, the number of Alzheimer’s sufferers will reach nearly 14 million.

Children of aging parents who suspect a parent is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, or have  a parent already diagnosed with the disease, should consider a Power of Attorney (POA).

A POA gives a family member the legal right to step in and make decisions that a parent with an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis is unable to make themselves, or doesn’t want to. 

There are various, even urgent, situations when having a POA is extremely important. For instance, you may need to:

  • Find a trusted money manager to handle day-to-day bill paying and the daily money management of bills, medical and insurance statements, tax preparation, and other personal financial tasks.
  • Act as family spokesperson regarding medical appointments, surgery, and doctor appointments.
  • Take care of things at home if your parents or loved one is still healthy enough to travel in retirement, or at any time they are away from their home.

We hope you will consider us if Daily Money Management is a concern. We are experienced, trusted, and a member of AADMM, the American Association of Daily Money Managers.

Senior Drug Misuse and Abuse

The following article is provided by Cincinnati-based senior home care provider, A Caring Choice. We consider A Caring Choice to be a subject matter expert on senior care and commend them for winning Business of the Year from the Colerain Chamber 2015, and USA Cincinnati Chamber 2014. We encourage our subscribers to sign up for their free monthly newsletter Cincy Senior Corner on their website.

Underestimated and under diagnosed, senior drug misuse and abuse means older adults don’t get the help they need.

seniorMore than 80 percent of seniors age 57 to 85 use at least one daily medication, and more than half take at least five medications or supplements daily, reports The National Institutes of Health (NIH). These older adults are more likely to use long-term prescriptions, use medication improperly, or use another’s medication to save money. All increase the risk of bad drug interactions.

Older adults are in danger of misusing and abusing drugs, particularly by accident. Their bodies have trouble metabolizing drugs. Some medicines they use don’t mix well with other prescribed medications, over-the-counter drugs and herbal remedies. And according to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), highly addictive drugs for anxiety, pain and insomnia often are prescribed for them.

Possible Causes, Likely Symptoms

Life changes can lead to dependency on drugs (and even alcohol):

  • Retirement, loss of income or financial strain
  • Death of a spouse, family member, close friend or pet
  • Loss of mobility, relocation or nursing home placement
  • Family conflict
  • Mental health decline such as depression, stress and memory loss
  • Physical health decline due to major surgeries and pain

Unfortunately, symptoms of dependency often mimic those of actual diseases and conditions, such as diabetes, dementia or depression, or aging itself, the FDA advises.

Treatment and Prevention

Older adults don’t always realize the risks of drug interactions, may be reluctant to admit a problem or ask for help. If family and friends recognize what’s going on, they may not want to intervene—or believe seniors are less likely to benefit from treatment, or that it’s a waste of resources to try.

A family member or friend may need to accompany a senior on doctor visits, organize the older adult’s prescriptions and monitor his or her daily regimen. Abuse may require detoxification, counseling to change unhealthy thinking patterns, and medications to counter the effects of other drugs or relieve withdrawal symptoms—not to mention ongoing support to recover fully.

Prevention is key:

  • Manufacturers can develop safe, effective and non-addicting pain medications.
  • Doctors can spend more time with patients, look for symptoms, notice increases in amounts and frequency of refill requests, and watch for patients who change providers to get prescriptions they want.
  • Pharmacists can help patients understand instructions for medications and watch for prescription falsifications or alterations.

With the help of family and friends, seniors can:

  • Inform doctors about all prescriptions, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins and dietary and herbal supplements.
  • Ask questions about potential interactions with other drugs and alcohol.
  • Follow pharmacist and label directions.
  • Store medications safely.
  • Get rid of unused or expired medications.

Editor’s remarks: DL MoneyMatters and A Caring Choice may from time to time exchange articles for publishing to our respective audiences. We welcome your feedback and hope that you share it with your friends and colleagues who have an interest in topics related to personal finance and senior care.

The Romance Scammer

The social side of the Internet can be a good and decent tool for the elderly living alone to feel “connected” in a meaningful way with the world outside their home. And for those looking for love online, beware of what may lurk between @ and .com — beware of the romance scammer.

The Society of Certified Senior Advisors (CSA) of which I’m a member, recently blogged about a good Christian man named Joseph and his blossoming online romance with a pink-cheeked English woman named Melanie. Spoiler alert: it doesn’t end well. This is a must read-and-share for anyone who cares about a retired or elderly person who may be “connecting” online.

Read the CSA blog on Romance Scammer »