More Than Washing Hands

Humans, by nature, value human life. Since the beginning of recorded history natural disasters have been a fact of human life and often centered on the number of lives lost. The Minoan civilization around 1500 B.C. appears to have been completely obliterated by a volcanic eruption with the assumption of all lives being lost to history. More civilizations have been lost to earthquakes and floods. If Noah’s Ark is in fact historical, we can assume the loss of life was astronomical. 

In our lifetime, the Haitian earthquake in 2010 is estimated to have taken between 85,000 to  230,000 human lives, depending on what government recorded the death toll, but its devastation should not be forgotten in the saga of history. Six years earlier, the tsunami in the Indian Ocean swallowed over 200,000 unfortunate souls.

Why are these events significant in light of the current calamity of Coronavirus? Natural disasters bring out the best in human beings. By reflecting on what has happened in the past, we may more easily process how we feel today and put things in perspective. 

Washing hands: Prevention #1

Disaster helps us to understand that while nature can be destructive, life lessons of strength and resiliency can make us all better human beings. In times of crisis, we become more unified, more empathetic, and we work harder for the common good. We develop a deeper sense of spirituality and oneness in our Creator. Those who don’t believe in a God still become more generous, more forgiving, more able to overcome adversity. 

As we stay at home following the rules for “quarantine cooking” we are staying more in touch on social media. Separated families are calling one another more often to check in and express concern and affection for one another. People are donating to charities who feed children unable to go to school. The virus is making a few of us sick, but making far more of us kinder, more generous human beings. It seems as though looking out for one another is our true human nature. We are doing more than washing our hands.

Learn what our local Freestore Foodbank has to say about COVID-19.